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Posts Tagged ‘ioan gruffudd’

This is a fairly low-budget British ‘horror’ film (albeit light on the horror aspect), which Cassie (Christina Ricci) is a young woman knocked over by a car in the sleepy town of Ashby Wake.  When she recovers, she has lost her memory and cannot remember what she is doing in the town.  The woman who knocked her over lets Cassie stay with her and her family, and Cassie forms a bond with the young son, Michael.  However, she is curious and concerned about the strangers who she keeps seeing in the town, but who seem oddly familiar to her, and she enlists the help of a man named Dan (Ioan Gruffudd).  Meanwhile, a buried church is discovered underground, and various members of the Anglican church in the neighbourhood are anxious to discover the mystery behind it.

I watched this film for the sole reason that Ioan Gruffudd was in it.  Horror is not really a favourite genre of mine, and religion is not a subject which would normally draw me to a film.  Nonetheless, I actually found this entertaining enough, despite a few plot holes and unresolved questions.

Christina Ricci was fine as the lead character, although some of the choices that character made seemed unlikely.  Ioan Gruffudd (who surely must have an ageing portrait in his attic, as he looks no different eleven years later than he does in this film) was also good as Dan – actually the best thing about the movie, from  my point of view.

In all, while this film does present more questions than it answers (or more truthfully just leaves some plotlines dangling), it’s an undemanding, slightly hokey experience, and not bad if you are a fan of the genre, or any of the main actors.

Year of release: 2003

Director: Brian Gilbert

Producers: Patrick McKenna, Pippa Cross, Rachel Cuperman, Marc Samuelson, Peter Samuelson, Steve Clark-Hall

Writer: Anthony Horowitz

Main cast: Christina Ricci, Ioan Gruffudd, Stephen Dillane, Kerry Fox, Simon Russell Beale, Peter McNamara

 

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This modern day fairy tale stars Ioan Gruffudd and Toni Collette as Alec and Zooey Morrison, a couple who are struggling to conceive and who are finding that it is causing problems in their marriage.  After they talk about fostering a child, a seven year old boy named Eli turns up on their doorstep, saying that the foster agency has sent him.  As he becomes a part of their family, he brings happiness back into their lives, but Eli has one final surprise for them.

This is a really lovely gem of a movie – it has no explosions, no special effects, just solid performances throughout, and lots of emotion (honestly it had me in tears a few times).  Gruffudd and Collette were terrific as a couple going through a very hard time – their pain was almost palpable.  There was a twist at the end which I feel obliged not to give away, but suffice to say that while I don’t always enjoy such twists, it fitted perfectly here.

In addition to the three leads (Maurice Cole is adorable in his debut role as Eli), there is great support from Richard E. Grant, as a mysterious man who seems to know all about the Morrisons, and Anne Reid and Hayley Mills as Zooey’s mother and the foster home manager respectively.

This seems to be a little known film, but if you get the chance to watch it, I would definitely recommend that you do!  Not only is it very moving, but at the end, I had a big smile on my face.

Year of release: 2011

Director: Jonathan Newman

Producers: Hale Coughlin, David Mutch, Alice Dawson, Deepak Nayar

Writer: Jonathan Newman

Main cast: Ioan Gruffudd, Toni Collette, Maurice Cole, Richard E. Grant

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In this beind-the-scenes comedy drama, David Duchovny is Mike Klein, a writer who pitches a pilot for a television show to a network.  The show is picked up, but then Mike realises that he has to compromise on every aspect of the show.

And that’s it in a nutshell…but this film is a very entertaining and amusing look at how a television pilot makes it from the page to the screen.  Sigourney Weaver plays Lenny, a boss at the studio who seems to have no life outside of work, and expects everyone to bow to her command.  Ioan Gruffudd is her much nicer colleague, who is swept along in the process, and even though he sometimes disagrees with Lenny, it is very hard for him to effect any change, trapped as he is between furthering his own career, and sticking to his principles.  Judy Greer puts in a great performance as Mike’s agent Alice, and Fran Kranz and Lindsay Sloane are Zach and Laurel, the two stars of Mike’s show.

The TV Set almost has a documentary feel to it – we are watching the process happen, and seeing how Mike becomes disillusioned.  Yes, he realises his dream of getting his show on the air, but at what cost?  Duchovny gave a good performance, and I could feel his frustration.  Justine Bateman was somewhat wasted as his wife however, but she made the best of a small part.

Definitely worth a watch – it is interesting and enjoyable, and while it may not be laugh-out-loud funny, there are plenty of amusing moments.  This film gets a thumbs up from me.

Year of release: 2006

Director: Jake Kasdan

Producers: Judd Apatow, Lawrence Kasdan, Jake Kasdan, Aaron Ryder, Ron Schmidt, Carey Dietrich, Paul Pressburger, Howard Tager

Writer: Jake Kasdan

Main cast: David Duchovny, Sigourney Weaver, Ioan Gruffudd, Judy Greer, Fran Kranz, Lindsay Sloane, Justine Bateman

 

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