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Posts Tagged ‘Miss Marple’

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This collection consists of 55 short stories by Agatha Christie – it should be noted that less than half feature Miss Marple despite the title of the compilation, and also that all stories have also been published elsewhere. However, it’s great to have so many of Christie’s short stories gathered together in one volume. (There is also a collection of all the Poirot short stories – 51 in all – and a further one of more than 50 short stories featuring other detectives who Christie wrote about, such as Tommy and Tuppence, Harley Quin, and more.)

Essentially if you have read and enjoyed any Agatha Christie books or watched any film or stage adaptations and liked them, then you will probably enjoy reading this collection. I personally dipped in and out of it in between reading other novels, but you could just read it straight through.

As with all short story collections, some are better than others, and it comes down to people’s opinions. My favourite were probably Witness for the Prosecution, and Greenshaw’s Folly, despite the fact that the latter was a Miss Marple story and I am not overly keen on Marple (LOVE Poirot though!) There weren’t any that I really disliked, so overall I would call this book a successful read!

 

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This is the fourth book in the Miss Marple series – although I think it is a bit of a stretch to call it a Miss Marple mystery, as Marple herself only appears towards the end of the story and utters a few words of wisdom. However, the book itself is still an interesting and intriguing read.

Jerry and his sister Joanna arrive in the village of Lymstock for a visit while Jerry recovers from an undisclosed accident. Fairly soon they, along with several other villagers, receive an unpleasant anonymous letter. When Mrs Symmington, the recipient of another such letter, commits suicide, the whole village starts to suspect one another…

As always with Agatha Christie, I enjoyed the book and was pleasantly surprised by the ending – I won’t give away any spoilers, but I thought I had sussed the mystery only to be surprised when the truth was revealed. This is what I love about Agatha Christie books – she is always able to surprise me, but she is fair in the way she does it. Not for her is there a sudden antagonist who has not appeared before in the book. Not for her is there a unforeseeable twist – the reader is given ample opportunity to work it out if they only look hard enough, but she is such a clever writer that she usually ends up outwitting her audience.

In any event, and as mentioned before, this is almost a stand-alone mystery – the appearance of Miss Marple is so brief that she is in fact an unnecessary addition to the plot (this is probably why I prefer Poirot, who is such a central character in the novels), but it is no less enjoyable for all that. There are some entirely unbelievable parts – for example, the police officer investigating the crime is more than happy to share his findings with Jerry, despite Jerry being nothing more than a visitor to the village – but for the sake of moving the story along, I am happy to ignore such things.

If you are a fan of Agatha Christie, this one will not disappoint.

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One of four films featuring Margaret Rutherford as Miss Marple – this was actually the last of the films, and was not based on one of Agatha Christie’s stories. As Miss Marple portrayals go, I think Rutherford’s was the least like the Miss Marple in the novels. But it is also the most amusing and entertaining. A member of a Trust for the rehab of young criminals is murdered, and the investigation takes Miss Marple onto the HMS Battledore in the search for the killer. That’s really all you need to know going in, and what ensues is an hour and a half of slightly daft but witty fun.

Margaret Rutherford is loveable, Bud Tingwell as Chief Inspector Craddock is surprisingly dishy and Stringer Davis as Miss Marple’s dear friend Mr Stringer, is highly entertaining. Watch and enjoy!

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Year of release: 1964

Director: George Pollock

Writers: David Pursall. Jack Seddon, Agatha Christie (Miss Marple character)

Main cast: Margaret Rutherford, Stringer Davis, Bud Tingwell, Lionel Jeffries, William Mervyn, Joan Benham, Nicholas Parsons, Miles Malleson, Henry Oscar, Derek Nimmo, Gerald Cross, Norma Foster

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This instalment of Agatha Christie’s Miss Marple series opens with the elderly lady detective’s friends Colonel and Mrs Bantry awakening to the distressing news that there is a body in their library. And indeed there is – a young lady who neither of them have ever seen before.

After calling the police, Mrs Bantry calls upon Miss Marple to help with the investigation and that wily old lady picks through the various clues and red herrings, to get to the truth of the matter…

The first thing I would note about this story is that, as in The Murder at the Vicarage, Miss Marple is little more than a background character for most of this book. Indeed, the majority of the detective work is done by the police, who have numerous potential murderers to investigate.

The second thing I would note is that…this does not matter one jot! I enjoyed the book and I thought the mystery was very well put together. I am not going to give anything away, but I will say that I did not guess the culprit, and there were other twists – one in particular – which I also did not see coming.

Another solid instalment in the Marple series – I look forward to reading more!

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This is the second book in the Miss Marple series and it takes on a bit of a different format. The premise is that every week, a group of friends including an author, a clergyman, an artist, an actress, a doctor, a solicitor, a retired police commissioner and a Colonel and his wife, and of course, Miss Marple herself, meet up and discuss mysteries and crimes which they have come across in their lives. They each know how their own stories turn out but the challenge is for the others to guess the truth. Naturally, and despite their initial dismissal of Miss Marple as a naive old lady who has led a sheltered life, it is she who works out all the mysteries before anyone else is able to do so.

The format deviates in the last story of the book, where Miss Marple requests the assistance of the former police commissioner to uncover a murder and stop a miscarriage of justice.

I’m not generally a huge fan of short stories but I did enjoy this collection. My favourites were probably The Blue Geranium, The Bloodstained Pavement and The Companion. Each story shows off Christie’s talent for plotting, red herrings and drop feeding clues, and the reader is shown more of Miss Marple’s quick and clever mind. I didn’t feel that we really got to know the rest of the characters in any great fashion – they were all painted with very broad brush strokes – but these stories are far more about the mysteries than the narrators.

Overall, a very enjoyable and easy reading collection. I look forward to continuing my quest to read through the books of Agatha Christie.

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This book is the first in Agatha Christie’s famous Miss Marple series and the third novel by Christie that I have read. I have a long way to go until I’ve read the rest of them and based on what I have read so far, I am looking forward to it!

When Colonel Protheroe is murdered in the local Vicar’s study, there are plenty of suspects – after all he was not a popular man in the small village of St Mary Mead, and tongues are set wagging. Miss Marple however is less interested in idle gossip and more interested in getting to the bottom of the case, and she applies her methodical thinking to solving the crime for which everyone seems to have an alibi.

What surprised me the most about this book is that Miss Marple is actually a fairly minor character in the story, at least until the end. The story is narrated by the Vicar Len Clement, and he himself gets involved in amateur sleuthing to try and uncover the murderer. He is a witty and self-deprecating character, and his observations about his fellow villagers are frequently very droll and amusing; I was actually surprised at how funny this book is.

But the story is essentially a murder mystery and as such it works very well. Just as with the Poirot book The Mysterious Affair at Styles, which I also read recently, I did not guess the murderer beforehand, and it helped that there were plenty of potential characters who could have done it (I am pretty sure I wouldn’t have guessed the murderer in And Then There Were None either, except that I watched a TV adaptation before reading the book).

I would definitely recommend this book to fans of the mystery genre – it’s more of a gentle pace then most thrillers, but if you enjoy whodunnits, I think this is definitely one to check out. I look forward to reading more Agatha Christie and soon!

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