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Posts Tagged ‘Natalie Portman’

This Woody Allen directed contemporary musical, which boasts a star-studded cast revolves around the love lives of an extended family, and takes place in Manhattan, Paris and Rome.

I only really wanted to watch this film because Tim Roth is in it, and I wasn’t sure whether I was going to enjoy it – I’ve not actually seen many Woody Allen films – but in fact it is utterly charming and really rather lovely.

The story is narrated by Djuna (known to everyone as DJ, and played by Natasha Lyonne). She starts by introducing the viewers to her family – stepfather Bob (Alan Alda), mother Steffi (Goldie Hawn), step-sisters Skylar (Drew Barrymore), Lane (Gaby Hoffman) and Laura (Natalie Portman) and step-brother Scott (Lukas Haas). Not forgetting her actual father Joe (Woody Allen).

While Holden (Edward Norton) and Skylar get engaged, Joe is bemoaning the demise of his latest relationship, and DJ decides to set him up with Von (Julia Roberts) the patient of DJ’s friend’s psychiatrist mother! Von is in an unhappy relationship, and Joe is determined to win her over.

Meanwhile, Lane and Laurie are both in love with the same young man, Bob is distraught that son Scott is turning into a young conservative, despite have extremely liberal parents, and DJ is busy falling in love with various young men. Things get even more complicated when recently paroled prisoner Charles Ferry (Tim Roth) turns up!

The cast mostly sing all their own songs (Barrymore is dubbed) and all the songs are well known musical classics. Obviously these actors are not professional singers, but for the most part they hold their own pretty well – in fact Goldie Hawn and Ed Norton apparently had to be told NOT to sing as well as they were able, as they were not believable as the characters randomly bursting into song which they were meant to be portraying.

There is also some quite amazing dancing, with lots of extras (obviously professional dancers) being used – and this film also contains probably the happiest funeral scene you will ever see! There is also a quite stunning dance towards the end of the film, featuring Goldie Hawn and Woody Allen – it is very cleverly and beautifully done.

The whole cast shines, but I would give special mention to Alan Alda and Goldie Hawn, and also to Tim Roth, who has a great time with his own relatively small role. Edward Norton is also terrific in a role that is very much unlike the kind of parts we are used to seeing him play.

Overall, if you are looking for a film that will make you laugh and feel warm and happy inside, I would strongly recommend you give this one a go. I loved it.

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Year of release: 1996

Director: Woody Allen

Writer: Woody Allen

Main cast: Alan Alda, Natasha Lyonne, Goldie Hawn, Edward Norton, Drew Barrymore, Woody Allen, Julia Roberts, Tim Roth, Gaby Hoffman, Natalie Portman, Lukas Haas

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This film is based on the Philippa Gregory book of the same name, which in turn is loosely based on the life of Mary Boleyn, sister of Anne.

Henry VIII has become bored with his wife Katherine of Aragon, and frustrated at her ability to produce a male heir.  The Duke of Norfolk Thomas Howard, and his brother in law Thomas Boleyn see an opportunity to elevate their family’s financial and social position by enticing the king with Anne Boleyn – the hope being that Anne will become eventual Queen.  However, Anne quickly falls out of favour, and so the family push Anne’s sister Mary towards the king instead – and the two begin an affair.  When Mary becomes pregnant, the family worry that Henry will lose interest in her, and so enlist Anne to keep his attention away from other women (namely Jane Seymour) and to keep his interest in Mary.  However, Anne has her own plans and soon lures Henry away.  But when Anne becomes Queen of England, she realises that neither her safety nor her security is assured…

As a piece of historical fiction, I enjoyed this film.  However, it appears to be only loosely based upon the novel, and huge (and I do mean huge) chunks of the story have been cut out or changed (for instance, Mary only has one child with Henry in this film – but in the book, she had two; also when Anne was executed, a number of men were also executed for commiting adultery with her – in the movie however, only her brother George is shown as being executed).  This means that the film moves on at a more disjointed pace than the book.

Natalie Portman is truly beautiful as the enchanting and scheming Anne Boleyn, and while I am not always a fan of Scarlett Johansson’s acting, I think she did a good job here, although Mary is portrayed as very meek and mild, which almost certainly was not really the case.  I did feel sorry for her character though – plucked from a happy marriage, to be paraded before the king, to serve her family’s own selfish interests.  However, while certainly the fault of the actors, the characterisation of the characters was largely unexplored – a shame, because it felt like a missed opportunity.

Eric Bana played Henry VIII at a time in his life when the king was still young, handsome and charismatic.  Although he shows flashes of compassion however, he is portrayed as selfish and egotistical.  All three leads played their parts well.  Kristin Scott Thomas was also icily cool as the motherof the Boleyn girls, who is upset at the way her husband and brother in law exploit their daughters.  The only weak link in the cast for me was David Morrissey who played the Duke of Norfolk.  Morrissey is normally a reliable actor, but he seemed somewhat miscast here.

Overall then, as a piece of entertainment this is a film I would recommend to fans of the genre – it certainly held my attention throughout – but under no circumstances should be taken as historically accurate.  (This does not personally bother me; after all both the film and novel are classed as fiction – however, the inaccuracies may bother some viewers.)  One thing that did bother me – the film did not even attempt to explain what happened to William Carey, the first husband of Mary Boleyn (he actually died of a sweating disease), which I felt was something of an oversight.  I’d be eager to see the 2003 adaptation of the book, to see how the two compare.

Year of release: 2008

Director: Justin Chadwick

Writers: Philippa Gregory (book), Peter Morgan

Main cast: Natalie Portman, Scarlett Johansson, Eric Bana, Kristin Scott Thomas, David Morrisey

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Click here for my review of the novel.)

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Zach Braff is Andrew Largeman, a tv actor who has lived in LA and had little to do with his family for nine years.  However, when his father calls to tell him that his mother has died unexpectedly, Andrew has to go back to New Jersey for the funeral. While there, he catches up with old friends, and more importantly meets a girl named Sam (Natalie Portman) who is quirky, cute and more alive and vital than Andrew can ever imagine he or his friends being.

While he is in New Jersey, trying to avoid spending time with his father (who is also his psychiatrist) and attempting to work out where he is headed in life, Andrew confronts some painful memories of his past, and is reminded that only by letting go of who we once were can we decide who we truly want to be.  Meanwhile, Sam shows him that despite the obstacles people face, they can still live in the here and now, and have fun.

Ultimately, this is a film about redemption and love.  Zach Braff is impressive and manages to shake off his JD character from ‘Scrubs’ very well.  (He also wrote and directed the movie.)  Natalie Portman is cute as a button, and Peter Sarsgaard is excellent as Andrew’s friend, the gravedigger Mark.

There were a lot less laughs than I thought there would be – this is not a comedy, although there are moments of gentle humour.  But it’s a sweet film, with lots of touching moments and two main characters who you can’t help rooting for.

Year of release: 2004

Director: Zach Braff

Writer: Zach Braff

Main cast: Zach Braff, Natalie Portman, Peter Sarsgaard

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